Genggai Climate Change

Sarisha Padayachy
Mikaela Elkon
Caleb Pillay
Zeenat Tilly
Tyler de Klerk

Boone

Genggai Climate Change

Genggai are formed to symbolize the negative attributes of climate change as well as the positive counterparts that can be adopted to combat them. The central vertical and horizontal lines are consistent throughout all of the symbols because they are the joining links for all the symbols to come together.

We used lines because they are seen everywhere in everyday objects. By using lines we are able to create shapes that represent something – represent ideas. By using sharp geometry and organic forms we are able to connote both natural and man-made aspects of climate change.

The circle represents the globe and unifies each and every symbol; since our concept has to do with both the negatives and positives of climate change we represented this idea by positioning the circle in either the lower or upper half of the symbol. This is in reference to the theories of the Cartesian plane and how the bottom section represents negativity and the upper section, positivity.

The linear consistency of the symbols, allows them to become connected on both vertical and horizontal axis that allow the symbols to create an intricate pattern that emulates the delicate and intricate balance of the natural world.

Sarisha Padayachy

Sarisha is a passionate graphic designer from Centurion, Gauteng, South Africa — capable of creating tradition, elegant and new graphic solutions for any communication issue.

Mikaela Elkon

Mikaela lives in Johannesburg, South Africa and is a current third year multimedia designer, studying at Greenside Design Center. She is interested in web and app design as well as coding.

Caleb Pillay

Caleb lives in Johannesburg, South Africa and is a current third year multimedia designer, studying at Greenside Design Center and specializing in new UX design.

Zeenat Tilly

Zeenat lives in Johannesburg, South Africa and is a current third year multimedia designer, studying at Greenside Design Center with a focus on development and coding.

Tyler de Klerk

Tyler is a passionate graphic designer who loves designing for a cause applying a 3D design background.

Gender Expression

Kellee Morgado

Boone

Gender Expression

Intended to directly challenge the rigid gender binary imposed on individuals within society of the Western world. This set of 45 symbols was created through both personal experience as a gender fluid individual, questioning conventional gender attributes, and making observations. By presenting the most basic of human appearances across all genders, the viewer is encouraged to question societal convention both personally in their own identity as well as globally.

The stylization was inspired by the earliest of mark making in cave paintings and pictographs. It gives a nod to the evolution of gender expression through history across various cultures as well as being easy to identify as a symbol and narrative. Each symbol was created using a small round brush and black acrylic paint on paper. These marks were then translated digitally while retaining an analog quality and story in appearance.

Kellee Morgado

Kellee Morgado is a native of California and a senior studying graphic design at Appalachian State University. With this chosen field of study, Morgado is attracted to the broad range of analog methods involved in the discipline including drawing, letterpress, book arts, collage, mixed media and experimentation. It is this diversity that draws her to the field. Her creative practice is a balance of both the handmade and digital which is reflected in the touch that she brings with her approach to graphic design.

Changing Animals

Andrea Gilbert

Boone

Changing Animals

Growing up, I have always had a tendency to pay more attention to the natural world around me instead of the human-made world I exist in. So, for this submission, I decided to make an icon set within the “Changing World” category, specifically looking at how animals are being affected by climate change. Climate change consists of multiple confusing, complex elements that are roughly linked via the “cause/effect” model. Oftentimes though, it’s hard to classify which element is an “effect” and which one is a “cause”, because our world’s ecosystem is so incredibly interconnected and interdependent. Thus, when creating these icons initially, I based what I’d include on causes and effects of climate change, through our world’s animals’ eyes. I didn’t specify visually which of these icons are causes or effects to represent the greyness that these elements often exist in within the grand scheme of climate change; however, on close inspection, one would be able to guess where an icon belongs. Climate change doesn’t just affect human beings; it affects the animals that live with us and beside us on this gravity-propelled, living rock we call Earth.

Andrea Gilbert

Andrea Gilbert is a senior Graphic Design student at Appalachian State University, located in the mountains of the east coast United States. She’s always been keenly aware of relationships, physical, theoretical, and otherwise, and this spurred her to pursue a degree and career in graphic design. She likes working with symbolism and information, and is inspired by both the natural and human-made world around her.

instagram.com/andreagilbert_design/

Changing Cities

Cole Finch

Boone

Changing Cities

The intended goal of these forms is to produce structure of symbols that represent the transition of urban development to smart cities. The capability of the symbols is to represent a city personally on how it is changing also what the city is capable of at that moment. Smart city is an urban development of making a city more internally and externally connected with main interest of reduction of carbon footprint, efficiencies in the city as well as having connectedness of the society.

The stylization of these symbols were inspired by how a city achieves modern evolution and how urban development in construction of a city is the combination of buildings, businesses and groups of people. The city represents the key part of the idea of the symbols so it is presented as the midpoint of the all the symbols by placing its form in the center. As a city progresses it must build out. The symbols are intended to gesture to icons that are familiar to citizens in their everyday use or past tools. Easily identified with the navigation symbol having strong visual form of a compass and also the recycle symbol playing with the iconic recycling symbol with see today.

Cole Finch

Cole Finch is a student in the Graphic Design Program at the Appalachian State University, expected to graduate in December 2017 with a BFA in Graphic Design also a business minor. He is the third son to a realtor and urban developer, which greatly impacts his work and influences his way of design. This has allowed him to connect plus communicate with people and material and create unity between the two. Upon graduation he hopes to further develop as a designer and help bridge gap between communications.

colefinch.com/

Unity in Diversity

Assra Tajbhai
Fatima Mohammed Bham
Nikita Govender
Ssanyu Sematimba

Johannesburg

TRUTH
truthcropped

JOY
joycropped

HONOR
honorcropped

LOVE
lovecropped

PEACE
peacecropped

UNITYall

Unity in Diversity

The world is made up of different cultures, ethnic groups, beliefs, and religious systems, but we are united by our diversity. Diverse groups in society live by unified morals and values: love, joy, honor, peace, and truth. With these values in mind, we have tried to create a language that unites, celebrates and glorifies diversity, but is still able to communicate the core fundamentals of each diverse group.

Natural water molecules inspired these fluid symbolic forms. Comparing water to ideological morals and values is the basis for every diverse group. Different water groups (molecules) represent different principles of life; Love –> Ripple, Joy –> Waves, Honor –> Waterfall, Peace –> Cascade, and Truth –> Meander. These principles are united to form one holistic core-featured symbol. By combining the eight symbolic elements derived from different languages, the symbols become interchangeable, forming a united yet diversified encompassing language.

Winner globalmurmurs 16/17

Jury Statement

“Unity in Diversity” is not only the title of the project, but it is in many facets the representation of this – on the first glance – contradicting idea. The conceptual setup appears initially quite straightforward, with the visualization of five words: truth, joy, honor, love and peace. Each of the five words are visualized by a composed “fountain” of eight elements. The eight single elements communicate a visual translation of the word in eight different languages/cultures. In this construction, the symbol “TRUTH” is built by the following languages: Yiddish, Japanese, Spanish, Dutch, Portuguese, Bengali, Xhosa, and Zulu. In addition, the designers successfully incorporated the water element, which unifies humans in each of their symbols. The five fountains are designed with refinement and a delicate fusion of sub-symbols offering a unique and coherent visual language. Each symbol is distinctive yet follows one aesthetic idea.

As much as the language expertise of the international jury allows, the symbols are capturing the idea of truth, joy, honor, love or peace in each cultural context. “Unity in Diversity” was created by a group of four young designers from diverse cultural backgrounds, all studying in South Africa. The contribution of four personalities who are reflecting their own culture, but still managing to unify the visual appearance of the symbols, is another brilliant achievement of intercultural visual communication demonstrated in this work.

Assra Tajbhai

Assra Tajbhai is a Muslim woman born and raised in Botswana, and currently residing in South Africa. Her ethnic background is quite diverse. Her father is a South African Indian; her mother is a Pakistani of Syrian/Iranian descent.

Fatima Mohammed Bham

Fatima Mohammed Bham is a Muslim woman born and raised in South Africa. Her religion is everything to her. Her father is of Indian descent and her mother is of Indian and Turkish descent. Culture and tradition are very important to her; each person has a unique story, but we can be united by those differences.

Nikita Govender

Nikita Govender is a Hindu Indian woman born in Johannesburg, and raised in Cape Town and Durban, where her parents are from. Growing up around diverse cultures and ethnic groups made her the designer she is today, with the mindset and belief in what is communicated in her group’s 45 symbols.

Ssanyu Sematimba

Ssanyu Sematimba is Ugandan-South African. She was born in Uganda, but raised in South Africa. She was raised in a Christian home. She is very passionate about her faith, but does not believe in tarnishing the beliefs of others to stand up for what you believe in. Christianity is about love, and that’s exactly what she believes in. Loving and embracing everyone.

Urbic

Tracy Bassil

Byblos

URBIC

URBIC is a system that combines Urban Studies terminology with the Arabic language and unites them visually with their English meaning. The reason behind developing such a system is the cultural boundaries and difficulties we face in a multilingual country. For instance, Arabic is the national language of Lebanon, but people are usually educated in French or English. Discussing urban issues using Arabic terminology is almost impossible. Discussing urban issues in technical terms to non-professionals poses problems, even if the language is shared. This project simplifies urban terminology so that it can reach a broader audience by following one simple guideline: The meaning of the English term is translated visually and literally through the lines that shape the Arabic equivalent term. Therefore, the universal language of visuals reconciles multiple cultural identities and brings the profession closer to its real users.

Winner globalmurmurs 16/17

Jury Statement

For centuries, ornamental explorations of Arabic script have been diverse and mesmerizing. The great visual richness manifests both in an elaborated application derived from handwriting, as well as in abstract geometric patterns and ornamentations. This is particularly true in the architectural context. The URBIC experiment combines these visual traditions with current urban design themes in a surprising approach. Concepts of urban planning are reproduced as characters in Arabic translation; they convey meaning visually without abandoning readability. Tracy Bassil combines her passion as an Architecture and Digital Media student with the local visual culture of Beirut to raise awareness of urban challenges like accessibility, densification, urban sprawl, and environmental equity. In a playful way, this reminds us of our social responsibilities building the physical and digital infrastructures for future generations. Even though not all symbols appear perceptible at first glance to the Arabic reader, the jury was impressed by the convincibility of the global visual language, its unique approach to hybridity, and the design quality of the 45 symbols.

Tracy Bassil

I am an Architecture student expecting to graduate in Spring 2017 with a minor in Digital Media. The broad spectrum of design intrigues me, especially graphic design, animation, urban planning, and industrial design. I am also interested in the way national identity is expressed or repressed in architecture, arts, and social interactions.

https://issuu.com/tracybassil

Genomics

Sean Burgess

Boone

Genomics

Genetic engineering has become increasingly prominent in recent years. GMOs have become a common occurrence in the food we eat, while studies conducted on human genetics and chromosomes have shown to identify underlying causes of various disease. There are both positive and negative associations with this rapidly advancing technology. While there are advantages to manipulating human genetics, such as eradication of various diseases, there is a clear moral dilemma in regards to ethics and approaching the matter with appropriate caution.

In order to assist the viewer in better understanding such a contentious topic through these symbols, the form of a chromosome was chosen as a container. Chromosomes contain all of the genetic information stored in living organisms. They are a fundamental in understanding how living organisms work and change. Additionally, the symbol’s meanings relate to the visual form of chromosomes as seen from under a microscope.

Winner globalmurmurs 16/17

Jury Statement

The project “Genomics” by Sean Burgess deals with GMOs (genetically modified organisms), using recombinant DNA methods, gene modification, and transgenic technology. This current and polarizing topic questions social, political, economic, ethical, and moral values of our society. Is this really the way we, as citizens, want to optimize, control, manipulate and shape our world? Burgess applies the principles of genetic modeling to the visual form of his project. He modifies a simple structure into a complete set of diverse and variable iterations, creating increasingly complex constructions. As a “creator,” Burgess strictly follows a systematic, precise, and minimal approach that is dominated by a characteristic diagonal orientation.

Each symbol is described by a disciplinary terminology of genetics. It is supplemented with a term of mundane language to enable a layperson to grasp the full understanding of the concept. As an example, one of the symbols is called “Trisomy and Error,” and another is called “In Vitro and Design.” The jury was particularly impressed by the clarity and abstraction in his visual scheme. The outstanding qualities of Sean Burgess’ work are the analytic and visual approach, the clear exploration of symbolic elements, and its elaboration and execution.

Sean Burgess

Sean Burgess was born in Jacksonville, Florida, to a military family. He spent his early childhood moving across the country to California and then back to his family’s hometown in North Carolina. Interest in design as a teenager led him to serving in the military as a Mass Communication Specialist, exposing him to various forms of design and production. He currently resides in the mountains of North Carolina, pursuing design as both a passion and career choice.

http://www.appstate.edu/~burgesss/portfolio/

Uniqueness

Thi Tran

Houston

Uniqueness

One can’t always judge the quality of a person by his/her appearance or gender. Every single human being is unique. We eat, sleep, play, develop and execute things differently. This makes us who we are and distinguishes us from one another, not simply by our gender alone. In the United States, there are an estimated 700,000 transgender adults. Everyday, they are striving to be comfortable in their own chosen gender identity. They desire for the freedom to be themselves without judgment or discrimination. These people are no different from us, we are all just simply human beings.

With the idea of “we are all the same but also, we are all different,” I chose snowflakes to symbolize the uniqueness of human beings. Snow might all look the same to the naked eye, but under the microscope every snowflake is unique. With these 45 symbols, I want everyone to understand and celebrate the beauty of individuality, the beauty of being who we want to be.

Thi Tran

Thi Tran is originally form Vietnam, and moved to the United States when she was thirteen. She’s currently studying graphic design in University of Houston. Creating these 45 symbols have gave her so much joy and knowledge, and for her, this project does not stop at the 45th symbol. She is still going to continue creating snowflakes for people around her, because the celebration of individuality and being who we want to be should not be stopped.

Watching You

Yoko Kristiansen

Houston

Watching You

Mass surveillance has been revealed to be more than just security cameras and police. In 2013, a whistleblower leaked information regarding the government having control over electronic information as well as phone calls. Authorities are able to tap into any calls or emails sent and received by everyone in the nation at will. However, this added security that our government claims to give us seems to be costing our privacy, and even tipping the balance of power. Does it really deter criminal activities? What if this power falls in the hands of those who would use it against us? What happens if we just reveal everything in the first place?

The symbols created for this project are designed to resemble a badge that can expose an individual’s identity. These symbols are to be worn to show a person’s intentions and emotions. Multiple symbols can be used together to accurately describe one’s state of mind. Imagine a dystopian society where we are all required to wear these symbols. There is no privacy to begin with. There is nothing to hide. Just a raw identity that can be surveyed by anyone at will.

Yoko Kristiansen

Yoko Kristiansen is a graphic designer based in Houston Texas. She studies at University of Houston.

https://www.behance.net/onoitsyoko

Legalizing LGBT Relationships in Taiwan

Aslin Yu-Heng Lin

Taiwan

Legalizing LGBT Relationships in Taiwan

The issue of legalizing gay marriage is extremely controversial in Taiwan. Multiple appeals, all in favor of LGBT rights, have been made to the Supreme Court to reinterpret Taiwan’s constitution.

These 45 symbols represent the existing diverse relationships in Taiwan; some of them include transgender couple, same-gender couple, and same-gender family with children. Through the restructuring of traditional Chinese characters, this project aims to promote LGBT rights within the bounds of traditional Chinese culture.

Aslin Yu-Heng Lin

Yu-Heng Lin is a Commercial Design student at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology in Taipei. She has always been fascinated by the fact that everything is designed in some way. This sparked her interest in art, advertising and graphic design, and eventually led her to the Commercial Design Program at NTUST. Now she spends her days perfecting design skills, focusing on packaging, web, brand identity and editorial design.

https://www.behance.net/Aslin