Uniqueness

Thi Tran

Houston

Uniqueness

One can’t always judge the quality of a person by his/her appearance or gender. Every single human being is unique. We eat, sleep, play, develop and execute things differently. This makes us who we are and distinguishes us from one another, not simply by our gender alone. In the United States, there are an estimated 700,000 transgender adults. Everyday, they are striving to be comfortable in their own chosen gender identity. They desire for the freedom to be themselves without judgment or discrimination. These people are no different from us, we are all just simply human beings.

With the idea of “we are all the same but also, we are all different,” I chose snowflakes to symbolize the uniqueness of human beings. Snow might all look the same to the naked eye, but under the microscope every snowflake is unique. With these 45 symbols, I want everyone to understand and celebrate the beauty of individuality, the beauty of being who we want to be.

Thi Tran

Thi Tran is originally form Vietnam, and moved to the United States when she was thirteen. She’s currently studying graphic design in University of Houston. Creating these 45 symbols have gave her so much joy and knowledge, and for her, this project does not stop at the 45th symbol. She is still going to continue creating snowflakes for people around her, because the celebration of individuality and being who we want to be should not be stopped.

Watching You

Yoko Kristiansen

Houston

Watching You

Mass surveillance has been revealed to be more than just security cameras and police. In 2013, a whistleblower leaked information regarding the government having control over electronic information as well as phone calls. Authorities are able to tap into any calls or emails sent and received by everyone in the nation at will. However, this added security that our government claims to give us seems to be costing our privacy, and even tipping the balance of power. Does it really deter criminal activities? What if this power falls in the hands of those who would use it against us? What happens if we just reveal everything in the first place?

The symbols created for this project are designed to resemble a badge that can expose an individual’s identity. These symbols are to be worn to show a person’s intentions and emotions. Multiple symbols can be used together to accurately describe one’s state of mind. Imagine a dystopian society where we are all required to wear these symbols. There is no privacy to begin with. There is nothing to hide. Just a raw identity that can be surveyed by anyone at will.

Yoko Kristiansen

Yoko Kristiansen is a graphic designer based in Houston Texas. She studies at University of Houston.

https://www.behance.net/onoitsyoko

Legalizing LGBT Relationships in Taiwan

Aslin Yu-Heng Lin

Taiwan

Legalizing LGBT Relationships in Taiwan

The issue of legalizing gay marriage is extremely controversial in Taiwan. Multiple appeals, all in favor of LGBT rights, have been made to the Supreme Court to reinterpret Taiwan’s constitution.

These 45 symbols represent the existing diverse relationships in Taiwan; some of them include transgender couple, same-gender couple, and same-gender family with children. Through the restructuring of traditional Chinese characters, this project aims to promote LGBT rights within the bounds of traditional Chinese culture.

Aslin Yu-Heng Lin

Yu-Heng Lin is a Commercial Design student at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology in Taipei. She has always been fascinated by the fact that everything is designed in some way. This sparked her interest in art, advertising and graphic design, and eventually led her to the Commercial Design Program at NTUST. Now she spends her days perfecting design skills, focusing on packaging, web, brand identity and editorial design.

https://www.behance.net/Aslin

Urban Sprawling

Mathew Oakes

Houston

Inequality of Urban Space

This set of symbols represents a narrative from past to present in order to help shape a healthier future. Countless cities around the world are experiencing population growth at such an exponential rate that they are forced to expand their borders. This is known as urban sprawling. The issue is not in the expansion itself, but rather the means in which it is accomplished. New developments are concerned with one thing, proximity to the inner city. So much so that they irresponsibly overtake once thriving ecosystems, often supporting niche species of wildlife that are forced to vanish.

These symbols contain nine subsets, each representing a location in or around a fictional developing city. Rather than starting with a blank canvas for each symbol I chose to add on top of an existing symbol. These subsets are progressions of urban developments as the need for access, traffic flow, and residential and commercial space increases. This progression is shown through the enlarging of existing shapes and addition of new shapes.

Although these locations are fictional the issue is far from it. Understanding the severity of this situation is just the beginning.

Mathew Oakes

Mathew is a graphic designer and is in his senior year at the University of Houston. He’s always looking for unique opportunities to utilize and enhance his skills as an effective designer by teaming with others in creative environments. In addition to graphics he also enjoy environmental photography, and landscape architecture.

Jozi Spots

Kimberly Gosling, Birgitta Le Roux,
Kaylynne Thompson and Zanele Mkhwanazi

Johannesburg

Inequality of Urban Space

There ain’t no burger like a Joburger, and what is the best way to experience Johannesburg and the people who live in it? The answer to that is to explore this city and experience its rich cultures, its vibrant people and the history that surrounds it.

These icons are inspired by the areas and hot spots in Johannesburg where you can find all that this city has to offer. They are a celebration of what Johannesburg has to offer to everyone who visits the city, all one has to do is look at the map of Johannesburg and they will see all these great places that they can explore. These icons are the mapped representations of some of the top places for tourists and locals to visit in some of the most amazing up and coming areas in the city.

Kimberly Gosling, Birgitta Le Roux,
Kaylynne Thompson and Zanele Mkhwanazi

Kimberly Gosling, Birgitta Le Roux, Kaylynne Thompson and Zanele Mkhwanazi worked together as a group as they were all born and breed in Johannesburg. They decided to create the symbols to highlight areas in ‘Jozi’ that they love, especially as Johannesburg is often overlooked as a tourist destination.

Techgrow

Candice Cantu

Houston

Techgrow

Technology has rapidly advanced since the start of the 21st century and is quickly minimizing the efforts of tasks both big and small. It has changed our world for better and for worse, allowing us to communicate across devices around the world, yet also invade privacy and promote negligence in manual labor. Science and engineering have already made great leads towards technology in transplants, machinery, and devices, but have also made big predictions for future hi-tech gear. Many of these predictions made by creators and society have also showcased themselves in imaginary worlds designed by Hollywood. It leads one to wonder what the future of technology will actually look like and how society will function with these hi-tech gadgets and ideas.

Technological Growth illustrates the variety of scientific knowledge that we live with today and the direction it is heading in according to science and pop culture. Product description and purpose are translated into an arrangement of geometric and abstract shapes and lines, which invents 45 visual depictions and systems of present and future technological devices and services.

Candice Cantu

Candice Cantu is a senior at the University of Houston, School of Art. She’s a graphic design major, a musician, a poet, and a lover of challenges and fine craft.

http://candicecantu.com

Energy Crisis

Vanessa Ros

Houston

Energy Crisis

Energy is an elemental component in our life. For years, we have been relying on limited natural resources to fulfill our needs for energy. Coal, natural gas and oil cover 80% of our current energy needs in the world and the demand is expected to grow almost half over the next twenty years. These natural resources are in limited supply because it takes hundreds of thousands of years to replenish the assets. With seven billion people living on our planet, how long are we going to be able to rely on these resources? We only have an average of 70 years left of nonrenewable resources. Over-consumption, over-population, poor infrastructure and a deficient distribution system are just some of the factors that brought on this crisis. Reality is that it is impossible to have such high demand on limited natural resources without ultimately running out.

For my 45 symbols I was inspired by the wistful situation in my country. Venezuela is a country that has its entire economy based on petroleum. I have witnessed the mass amounts of destruction that humans cause for the sake of our economy.

Formally, I was inspired by electric circuits diagrams. Every symbol defines an aspect of the crisis and the decay and devastation of our natural resources. The varied weight of the lines show the degradation of our planet and how it is being destroyed by humans. The circles serve as a foundation for the almost incomplete lines.

Vanessa Ros

Vanessa is currently a senior Graphic design student at University of Houston. She was born in Caracas, Venezuela and moved to Houston almost eight years ago. One of her biggest passions is lettering and typography. She is very influenced by her culture and try to bring different aspects to her designs. Coming from another country opened her eyes as a designer and definitely shaped who she is as a creative person. She is inspired by everything that surrounds her and is always open to learn new things.

https://www.behance.net/vanessaros

Self Destruction

Danielle Rouillard, Marcel Sadowski,
Siane Power and Jessica Donner

Johannesburg

Self Destruction

In this ever changing world it is important that we stay present, that we do not get lost in the everyday happenings of our own lives and forget to look up, look around and then look within. In order to move forward, as individuals, as a society, as a world community, we have to be aware.

The message that we have chosen to embody in our 45 symbols is one of awareness. A state of awareness that we do not feel is realistically achieved by the majority of the world community. While it is common knowledge that there is global climate change in effect, a certain sense of denial amongst some and perhaps a removal of the self from the effects of such seem to prevail.

We have chosen to represent both the causes and effects of climate change on one sphere, many of which each person interacts with on a day-to-day basis. By doing so one is faced with accountability. The connections between individual actions and global events are exposed. It thus becomes evident that we are not merely isolated islands, but rather one body, living, breathing and acting together.

We aim to abolish this personal bubble and to connect individuals on a global scale, as one world community, facing the same challenge.

We worked as a group of four, as we were all born and breed in Johannesburg. The members of our group are: Danielle Rouillard, Marcel Sadowski, Siane Power and Jessica Donner.

Marcel Sadowski

Marcel Sadowski is a digital designer from Johannesburg, South Africa. He is currently studying Multimedia Design at Greenside Design Center and specializes in UX/UI design and front-end web design. Clean lines and beautiful type define his style and he always tries to find the most efficient way to complete any task.

https://www.behance.net/Marcel_Sadowski

Danielle Rouillard

Danielle Rouillard is a digital designer from Johannesburg, South Africa and is currently studying Multimedia Design at Greenside Design Center. She creates minimalistic designs with small intricacies and elegant typography. Writing is a great love of hers and so is designing for a cause in the hopes that her design will contribute more to the world.

https://www.behance.net/Danielle_Rouillard

Jessica Donner

Jessica Donner is a Multimedia Designer from Johannesburg, South Africa. She received her B.A from Greenside Design Center in 2015. Shortly after graduating, she accepted a job at a social branding agency, helping companies build up their brands and advertise online. In addition to designing, Jessica is a dedicated aquariast and herptologist, dedicating most of her time to raising awareness around environmental issues across the globe.

https://www.behance.net/JessicaDonner

Siané Power

Siané Power is a young sprightly multimedia designer and currently studying her honours in Visual Communication at Greenside Design Center. What she enjoy the most about what she does is illustration and motion graphics, she thinks that they are the bee’s knees and super fun to create. But in general, she feels passionate about the idea of using design as a tool to change the world for the better and hopes one day to achieve amazing things.

www.behance.net/sianepower

Endangered Animals

Jose Diaz

Houston

Endangered Animals

The world is constantly changing, but not always in a positive way. With the increase in human population, there is an excessive amount of demands on natural resources. Removing trees and plants to increase areas of cultivation has become a custom to our society. But what one does not realize is that this process destroys the homes and habitats of many species.

It appears that the amount of endangered species grows and grows everyday. Many creatures are hunted down for sport while others are killed for their fur or ivory tusks. Not all endangered species are being hunted, but the amount of pollution and filth created by humans are harming these creatures and causing them to decrease in population.

There are many organizations that try to protect these species from being extinct, but that is still not enough. These 45 symbols depict species that are in critical danger, as they are being depleted from the face of this earth. With these forty five symbols, I hope to bring more awareness to this crisis, as together we can stop this problem.

Jose Diaz

My name is Jose C. Diaz. I am currently a Graphic Design student at the University of Houston. I was introduced to this subject matter via a professor, but it turned out to be one of my favorite projects this semester. As a young graphic artists I enjoy illustration quite a bit, therefore the “45 Symbols” concept quickly peaked my interest.

http://josecdiaz.com

/ˈlo.kwiː/

Raafia Jessa

Houston

Loqui

/ˈlo.kwiː/ (loqui)
Speak, Listen, Be heard

Research suggests that the key to language development may directly relate to the environment in which it is spoken. Relationships may exist between average yearly temperature, rainfall and degree of tree cover and the sounds and syllables used. Previously, the concept of acoustic adaptation was applied to songbirds: the frequencies of their songs alter depending on the level of vegetation in their habitat.

Current political events portray the Middle East in a very negative light. As a consequence, discrimination against traditional conventions such as the way people dress, or speak is on the rise. Language is the primary method of human communication; if language is forbidden, open communication cannot occur and misconceptions are further cemented.

This set of symbols is established on the idea that an alphabet is a set of visual symbols with assigned meaning and sound. This fictitious alphabet consisting of 45 symbols combine Urdu, Persian, Arabic, and Latin characters based on their sound. Arabic, Persian and Urdu all have a more extensive set of characters as compared to English; many sounds that can be made in these languages cannot be made in English. The 45 symbols were made to promote the concept of a universal language encompassing every type of individual without bias or stigma. Each symbol is attached to a character from IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) instructing the reader of the sounds of oral language that it represents.

/ˈlo.kwiː/ (loqui) is the idea that as humans we are all entitled to our own form of unencumbered communication, without being judged for the way any language sounds.

loquiyoutube
A playlist of the creation of the 45 symbols that make up Loqui on youtube

Creation and naming

Historically, both Persian and Urdu were built using Arabic as a “base” and thus use the same characters for their alphabets. Yet, languages developed over time, and more characters were added as more sounds were needed. Thus, placing the languages on a time line, it is seen that Urdu has the most characters as it is the language that was developed last.
The symbols are created by combining Arabic, Persian and Urdu characters with the sounds that they make. The sounds are spelt out using Latin characters and each symbol is named using International Phonetic Alphabet.
Thus, each symbol is a merging of Middle- Eastern and Western characters and the name of each symbol is a visual representation of speech sound created.

loqui_legend0

loqui_legend3

loqui_legend2

loqui_legend1

Raafia Jessa

Raafia Jessa is a student in the Graphic Design Program at the University of Houston, expected to graduate in May 2016. Before discovering graphic design, she spent almost three years as a math major with an English minor. Both these fields of study greatly impacted her and still influence her in the way she designs. Raafia has a fond relationship to proportion, simplicity and symmetry, principles on which her work is often based. Upon graduation she hopes to further develop as a designer and explore various avenues of design.

https://www.behance.net/rafjay